Leprechaun Lolita

2010

Leprechaun Lolita

Leprechaun Lolita – a strange merge of Irish folk law and Japanese Lolita fashion in 40 shades of green.

This body of work takes inspiration from Lolita, the Japanese cultural street movement, inspired primarily by the clothing and general aesthetics of the Rococo and Victorian periods. This fashion movement started in Japan in the 1980s and has evolved greatly since. Nowadays Lolita fashion has grown to be relatively popular all over the world. There are many sub-cultures to Lolita, such as Gothic Lolita (leaning towards the dark side) or Sweet Lolita (incorporating the colour pink). Harriet adds Irish flavor to this trend in her multi-media representations to create a new Irish sub-culture to the movement, “Leprechaun Lolita” brings these themes into an Irish context by including stories and characters from Irish fairy tales.

Harriets 2010 solo exhibition, ”Leprechaun Lolita’ was shown at The Art Mart Studios’ Gallery, Sligo Town, Co Sligo, Ireland.

The opening night was July 10th 2010 the show ran for two weeks until July 24th.

Here are some photos from the Gallery:

 

[read more=”Continue_Reading” less=”Read_Less”]

Original Press Release:

“Leprechaun Lolita” opens at the Art Mart Studios’ Gallery, located on the Mall in Sligo Town, the exhibition runs from 10th – 17th July 2010. The Art Mart Studios is an independent art space recently founded by three local Artists who use the space to create work, curate exhibitions and organize events to compliment the art scene in the North West.

Harriet presents new works which take inspiration from Lolita Fashion, the Japanese cultural street movement. She puts these themes into an Irish context by including stories and characters from Irish fairy tales. Harriet attempts to make Irish folklore accessible for today’s modern society by updating them through mixed media. Harriet has studied trends in global art and has adapted these for Irish representation.

Lolita is a Japanese street fashion inspired primarily by the clothing and general aesthetics of the Rococo and Victorian periods. This fashion movement started in Japan in the 1980s and has evolved greatly since. Nowadays Lolita fashion has grown to be relatively popular all over the world. There are many sub-cultures to Lolita, such as Gothic Lolita (leaning towards the dark side) or Sweet Lolita (incorporating the colour pink). Harriet adds Irish flavor to this trend in her multi-media representation to create a new Irish sub-culture to the movement, “Leprechaun Lolita”.

The exhibition is in various media, including watercolour, oil paint, sculpture and ceramics. Harriet also introduces new techniques to her portfolio in fabric and doll making crafts. These new techniques are well illustrated with “The Banshee”, a suspended ceramic sculpture incorporating both doll making and fabric crafts. Paintings include “The Phouka”, which are reminiscent of Harriet’s earlier works and the familiar duality of sweetness with darker undertones.

– by Cerian Gilhooley

[/read]